transitmaps:

Historical Map: Working Sketch for 1979 New York Subway Map by Nobu Siraisi

As you might probably guess, I’m not really that fond of the current New York Subway map, although its longevity is certainly to be respected. It was first revealed to the public in 1979, and — despite revisions, service changes and disasters — has remained pretty much the same ever since.

However, this preliminary sketch by designer Nobu Siraisi, collaborating with Michael Hertz on that map, is nothing short of delightful. It looks like it was made in an effort to untangle the web of route lines around the busy Atlantic Avenue station with an eye on label placement as well. Note that the label for Grand Army Plaza station has been erased from the right hand side of the route lines and redrawn to the left. It’s also interesting to see just how much cleaner and legible even this spaghetti-strand map is without the underlying street grid of the full map.

The interview in the Gothamist that this image came from is definitely worth reading, although Michael Hertz certainly has a very rose-tinted view of how his map replaced the Vignelli diagram that came before it.

Source: Gothamist interview with Michael Hertz in 2007, via Aaron Reiss (Twitter)

Catalyst Outdoor wants to put brightly colored, interactive LEDs all over center city. They claim that the garish fixtures will generate economic development, but we beg to differ.

policymic:

15 famous landmarks zoomed out tell a different story
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15 famous landmarks zoomed out tell a different story
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policymic:

15 famous landmarks zoomed out tell a different story
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policymic:

15 famous landmarks zoomed out tell a different story
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policymic:

15 famous landmarks zoomed out tell a different story
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policymic:

15 famous landmarks zoomed out tell a different story
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policymic:

15 famous landmarks zoomed out tell a different story
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policymic:

15 famous landmarks zoomed out tell a different story
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policymic:

15 famous landmarks zoomed out tell a different story
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“It started condemning businesses and 270 houses a generation ago, in the 1990s. All it has to show for it so far is a Bass Pro.”

Stephen J. Smith 

Read the rest of the article here

You’re cooking dinner. You realize you’re missing a key ingredient – garlic for the pasta, let’s say, or lettuce for your salad. Something without which you can’t get the meal on the table. How long would it take you to walk to a store where you can buy it?

"Texas may be known for its oil and gas industries and its love of driving, but on Wednesday, Mar. 26, the state set a record of a more environmentally friendly type: wind power." Read more here

Credit: AP Photo/L.M. Otero 

New York has revealed the results of the Rebuild by Design contest, and the results are anything but mundane. “The New York Metropolitan Area’s resiliency arsenal could soon include retractable roll-gates hanging from the FDR Drive, a long chain of manmade barrier islands ten miles offshore, buildings designed to accommodate major floods, revived marshes, fish-filled breakwaters and all sorts of other ingenious interventions.”

Credit: the BIG TEAM 

Video // How public spaces make cities work

architecturelab:

Video // How public spaces make cities work

More than 8 million people are crowded together to live in New York City. What makes it possible? In part, it’s the city’s great public spaces — from tiny pocket parks to long waterfront promenades — where people can stroll and play. Amanda Burden helped plan some of the city’s newest public spaces, drawing on her experience as, surprisingly, an animal behaviorist. She shares the unexpected…

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"For pro-development types, Chicago is often thought of as something of a promised land." However, that long-held reputation may be changing.

Rotterdam has long been an expert on how to handle climate change. Now, the city is sharing its expertise with the world

Credit: Moyan Brenn via Flickr